International News

News – The International Institute of Marine Surveying (IIMS)

Chairman of IACS satisfied with association’s achievements, emphasises the importance of being agile

Mr Ørbeck-Nilssen said that over the past year great progress had been made in modernising classification to deal with the digital transformation of shipping
Mr Ørbeck-Nilssen said that over the past year great progress had been made in modernising classification to deal with the digital transformation of shipping

Speaking at the Posidonia trade fair in Athens, Knut Ørbeck-Nilssen, who will hand over the reins of IACS in July, examined how the association had evolved during his time as Chairman.

In an industry undergoing rapid change, the IACS Chairman identified the need for classification societies and IACS itself to be adaptable and prepared for change, while staying true to the core purpose of classification.

Mr Ørbeck-Nilssen said that over the past year great progress had been made in modernising classification to deal with the digital transformation of shipping: “I’m pleased to see the progress that was made in modernising the concept of class, to adapt to the digital transformation we see in shipping today. I say transformation because the progress has truly been astonishing. IACS has embraced the challenges and changes ahead, to support the industry – contributing to the development of a safer and more secure maritime world. Looking ahead, the organisation needs to continue to focus on being agile in addressing relevant industry topics, to strengthen the role of class and to ensure that IACS keeps its position as the leading technical association in these times of rapid change,” he added.

“On behalf of the IACS organisation I would like to thank Knut and the DNV GL IACS team for the great collaboration throughout this chairmanship. The Chairman’s drive and ambition to modernise classification have prompted valuable discussions with the industry and the development of a robust long-term strategy that ensures the IACS organisation is fit for the future,” said Robert Ashdown, IACS Secretary General. IACS’ achievements during this chairmanship cover key areas such as autonomous shipping, cyber security, modern survey techniques, and internal benchmarking.

In autonomy, an IACS working group has examined all the relevant resolutions, to identify which standards present potential regulatory barriers to autonomous ship operations. The findings included barriers relating to machinery and electrical systems, safety systems, hull structures and survey procedures. As a next step, a pilot project looked at how to overcome these barriers.

To help the maritime community ensure the cyber-resilience of their assets, IACS established a joint industry working group focused on cyber safety. In its own panel, IACS is developing a number of recommendations for the newbuilding stage to assist shipbuilders in delivering cyber-resilient vessels.

As for the association itself, Mr Ørbeck-Nilssen noted that, for the first time in almost a decade, IACS has carried out a substantial revision of its membership criteria. In addition, a new internal benchmarking process supports members in improving their performance, while increasing the transparency of member’s quality performance. “These are important steps towards ensuring that IACS provides consistency in its high-quality support and becomes more transparent in its internal procedures,” said Mr Ørbeck-Nilssen.

In closing, Mr Ørbeck-Nilssen emphasised his belief in the continuing importance of IACS in changing and challenging times: “The industry is changing. Our ways of working may be changing. But the purpose of classification still remains the same: To protect life, property and the environment.”

The post Chairman of IACS satisfied with association’s achievements, emphasises the importance of being agile appeared first on The International Institute of Marine Surveying (IIMS).

The appointment of a suitably experienced surveyor is vital to avoid steel cargo damage says North P&I

North of England P&I Club has elected to publish a briefing document providing best advice leading to the minimisation of the risk of cargo damage
North of England P&I Club has elected to publish a briefing document providing best advice leading to the minimisation of the risk of cargo damage

Several problems can arise when transporting steel cargoes by sea reports North P&I. The more common issues can be broadly categorised as mechanical damage, or rust-related problems> indeed, in many cases the damage occurs before it is even loaded onto the carrying vessel. North of England P&I Club has elected to publish a briefing document providing best advice leading to the minimisation of the risk of cargo damage.

Common issues that can result in damage to the cargo include poor handling, substandard stowage and securing, water ingress into the hold and improper hold ventilation.

Key issues
Pre-shipment condition: It is not uncommon for steel cargoes to be damaged prior to loading on to the vessel. If the cargo is exposed to adverse environmental conditions or subject to poor handling, this can lead to rusting or mechanical damage before shipment. It is therefore very important that the Master ascertains that the condition of the cargo prior to loading and that the description of the cargo is accurately reflected in the bill of lading.

Mechanical damage whilst handling: Incorrect handling of the cargo whilst it is being loaded can lead to mechanical damage. Poor slinging, the use of incorrect lifting gear and rough handling with fork lifts can all lead to serious product damage and result in rejection of the cargo by the receiver. The crew should monitor closely the handling of the cargo and record any damage before it is accepted onboard.

Wetting damage in the hold: If the vessel’s cargo hatches are not weathertight, seawater or rain water may enter the holds and come into contact with the cargo, leading to rusting. The most effective means to avoid wetting is through proper ventilation of the hold. By monitoring and recording the dew points of the air within the cargo hold and the ambient air, correct and effective ventilation can be maintained.

Mechanical damage on voyage: Incorrect stowage on board, such as using unsuitable dunnage or poor standards of cargo stowage and securing can lead to cargo movement or shifting whilst on passage. One of the primary reasons is overloading. A common scenario concerns too many tiers of steel coils which lead to ovalisation of the lower tiers. As well as potential cargo damage, there is also a risk of hull damage should a steel cargo shift on passage, or of damage to the tank top from overloading.

Recommendations
– Appointing a surveyor: The appointment of a suitably experienced surveyor is vital in reducing the potential for claims arising from preshipment damage. A surveyor can offer valuable assistance to the Master in conducting a pre-load inspection of the steel product to make sure its condition is suitable for shipment. A suitably experienced surveyor will understand the importance of finding visible damage and rusting. They will also be able to advise the Master on the correct clausing to describe the condition of the cargo on the mate’s receipt and bill of lading.

– Hatch testing: To avoid allegations of water damage through ingress into the hold, and to show evidence of exercising due diligence to ensure the vessel’s seaworthiness, it is recommended that the attending surveyor inspects and tests the cargo hold hatches to ensure they are weather tight. The two most common methods are hose testing, or ultrasonic testing.

– Bills of Lading: Problems with steel cargoes are often evident prior to shipment. It is important that the Master understands the importance of clausing the mate’s receipts and bills of lading to reflect the actual apparent condition of the cargo on loading.

– Stowage, securing and carriage: In addition to the actual loading of the steel cargo, the hold preparation, stowage and securing are all important factors. To assist the Master meet the carrier’s obligations on the stowage and safe carriage of steel cargoes, North encourages operators to consider a surveyor’s assistance to assist with the tally and the stowage of the cargo after the pre-load survey is complete.

The Master’s responsibility
Where charterers are responsible for the loading and securing of the cargo in the charter party, specific instructions on what actions are to be taken should not be given by Masters. They must ensure that their supervision does not become an intervention, as they may then be assuming responsibility for cargo stowage and securing and liability in the event of an incident.

An intervention is defined as an act by a Master that limits a charterer’s right of control of the stowage, which may then transfer the liability for that stowage from a charterer to an owner.

Irrespective of who has responsibility for loading and securing the cargo under the terms of the charter party, Masters have an overriding duty and authority under the SOLAS Convention Chapter V, Regulation 34-1, to take any action deemed necessary to ensure the safety of the vessel.

Read the 11 page pdf briefing document: Carriage-of-Steel-Cargoes

The post The appointment of a suitably experienced surveyor is vital to avoid steel cargo damage says North P&I appeared first on The International Institute of Marine Surveying (IIMS).

One of the largest superyachts in the world is launched by Feadship

Once completed, Project 1007 will rank among the world’s largest superyachts
Once completed, Project 1007 will rank among the world’s largest superyachts

Feadship’s Project 1007 has been launched at the yard’s Makkum facility – at 110 metres (360 foot), it is the Dutch company’s largest ever superyacht. In addition, once delivered she will join Jubilee as the joint-largest yacht ever to be built in the Netherlands.

Interior styling is from Michael Leach Design in partnership with the owner’s personal New York decorator Brian McCarthy Inc., while De Voogt is responsible for the in-house naval architecture.

With few details so far revealed about the new four-deck displacement yacht, initial video shows a striking exterior and vast outdoor deck spaces. It is believed the steel hull supports an aluminium superstructure.

Project 1007 is being built to Lloyd’s Registry standards and features a dramatic architectural curve that links the main deck with the upper deck. Hatches in the topsides suggest there will be a side-loading tender garage and a fold-out beach club, however these features are yet to be confirmed by the yard.

Once completed, Project 1007 will rank among the world’s largest superyachts and will take the title of Feadship’s largest flagship from the 101.5 metre Symphony, which was launched in 2015.

The post One of the largest superyachts in the world is launched by Feadship appeared first on The International Institute of Marine Surveying (IIMS).

ABS delivers fuel advisory ahead of impending 2020 global sulfur cap offering practical guidance

ABS has issued the ABS Advisory on Marine Fuel Oil to help industry prepare for IMO’s 2020 global sulfur cap. The Advisory provides owners and operators with industry-leading guidance on the considerations and challenges with marine fuels which are likely to be used in addressing the 2020 global sulfur cap requirements.

“The IMO 2020 sulfur cap requirement will introduce a significant demand change from heavy fuel to low sulfur fuel almost overnight. The industry currently is debating how to prepare as the consequences of this shift are difficult to predict,“ said Dr. Kirsi Tikka, ABS Executive Vice President and Senior Maritime Advisor. “The ABS Advisory addresses concerns about the safety impacts and quality of the new blended and hybrid fuels that are currently not covered by the ISO fuel standard, and provides guidance on fuel selection, modification considerations and operational challenges.”

In a recent informal poll of shipowners and operators conducted by ABS, 53 percent said their fleets were not yet ready to meet upcoming sulfur cap requirements. As the deadline for compliance approaches, it is vital that industry consider the available options and the impacts on their fleets. The ABS Advisory provides in-depth technical guidance covering a range of topics, from fuel properties to operational risks to potential preparations. Using this Advisory to understand the implications of different marine fuels, owners and operators can make smarter decisions on the future of their fleets.

The available options to comply with the global sulfur cap include exhaust gas cleaning, burning compliant fuel or alternative fuels. In 2010 ABS provided guidance on switching from heavy fuel to 0.1% sulfur fuel when entering Emission Control Areas. This Advisory has been widely used by the industry and ABS has now updated this guidance to cover the regulation entering into force in January 2020.

The updated ABS Advisory includes background on air emission regulations and evaluates several relevant fuel types and the associated impacts and operational challenges for each.

ABS has led the way in helping industry prepare for upcoming air emission requirements. ABS introduced the world’s first scrubber-ready notation, providing guidance for owners who are planning to retrofit their vessel with a SOx scrubber at a future date. By looking ahead during the design phase and accounting for possible future retrofits, owners are better prepared to cost effectively manage future regulatory requirements.

Download the FREE 42 page pdf Marine Fuel Oil Advisory

The post ABS delivers fuel advisory ahead of impending 2020 global sulfur cap offering practical guidance appeared first on The International Institute of Marine Surveying (IIMS).

Green light to adopt Methanol given as a sustainable marine fuel

Topic areas of the project’s final reports include the technical feasibility of converting vessels to propulsion using Methanol
Topic areas of the project’s final reports include the technical feasibility of converting vessels to propulsion using Methanol

The Methanol Institute has welcomed the findings of the Sustainable Marine Methanol (SUMMETH) project, which has backed the increased use of Methanol as a marine fuel.

The research concluded that there are no obstacles to the efficient use of Methanol in a converted diesel engine and that smaller vessel conversion projects are feasible and cost-effective, with levels of safety that easily meet existing requirements.

Switching to Methanol would offer immediate environmental benefits, including close to zero SOx and particulate matter emissions and significantly lower NOx emissions compared to conventional marine fuels or biodiesel.

Joanne Ellis, Project Manager for SSPA which led the research says the partners sought to build on the work already done in earlier research projects that resulted in the Stena Lines and Waterfront Shipping methanol dual-fuel vessels, using a vessel type that could use Methanol in a converted single-fuel engine.

“The work on Stena Germanica and the Waterfront Shipping vessels proved the dual fuel concept in larger vessels; we wanted to understand whether conversion of a smaller engine was feasible. We looked at a road ferry with an engine capacity of about 350 kW which makes short trips between the mainland and the island of Ljusterö in the Stockholm archipelago, carrying people as well as cars, where there was a real desire to improve the emissions profile.”

Topic areas of the project’s final reports include the technical feasibility of converting vessels to propulsion using Methanol, the resulting environmental performance, bunkering issues and fuel supply now and in the future. The research programme was conducted by SSPA, ScandiNAOS, Marine Benchmark, Lund University, the Swedish Transport Administration Road Ferries, Scania, SMTF and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.

Dr Ellis adds that as Biomethanol increasingly becomes available, vessel operators will have the opportunity to blend in this zero-carbon fuel and progressively meet emission reduction targets set by the IMO.
“The Swedish government has recently asked the country’s Transport Administration to investigate making all of its ferries, pilot boats, icebreakers and workboats fossil-free by either 2030 or 2045, something that could make Biomethanol increasingly attractive. Sweden has the potential to satisfy required demand for the Biomethanol, which can be produced from renewable feedstock such as pulp mill waste, and there are several initiatives underway investigating the production of sustainable methanol.”SUMMETH also concluded that there are no barriers to bunkering the ferries, since this is already carried out by truck and could easily be switched from diesel to Methanol, enabling the ferry operator to immediately reduce particulate emissions and progressively reduce carbon emissions as renewable methanol becomes available.

“These are encouraging results which reinforce our view that Methanol provides one of the simplest, most efficient and cost-effective ways for the industry to comply with 2020 regulations and future CO2 emissions limits,” adds Chris Chatterton, Chief Operating Officer of the Methanol Institute. “The reductions not just in SOx and NOx but also PM will offer immediate environmental benefits, with the potential for Biomethanol to be progressively blended into the mix as more becomes available.”

SUMMETH was supported by the MARTEC II network and co-funded by the Swedish Maritime Administration, Region Vastra Gotaland, Oiltanking and the Methanol Institute.

The post Green light to adopt Methanol given as a sustainable marine fuel appeared first on The International Institute of Marine Surveying (IIMS).

Click here to view all IIMS news